Laughing, Weeping, Living

Life happens. You laugh about it or cry about it, sometimes both.

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on December 23, 2013

Today we had a big Family Meeting that included Jeremy and me, many people from the Palliative Care team, the attending PICU doctor and a PICU Nurse Practitioner, and the neurosurgeon and his Physicians Assistant. It was a full conference room.

We talked about a few major items.

Smiling in her sleep.

Smiling in her sleep.

1. Agnes’ shunt. This is the determining factor for her, going forward. It will be what limits her progress and dictates what further steps need to be taken. Tomorrow (Tuesday) at 12:00 noon, the neurosurgeon will replace Agnes’ current shunt with a V-A shunt, which will drain Cerebral Spinal Fluid directly into the right atrium of her heart. This type of shunt is already not a super good choice, and in Agnes’ case it could fail right from the get-go, because Agnes has increased pressure in the right side of her heart due to pulmonary hypertension. The pressure difference may not be great enough to allow the shunt to drain properly. If this turns out to be the case, we could know within a few hours to a day that the shunt will not work. If the pressures are kind of borderline, it might take a longer period to know whether the shunt will work or not. Or the shunt may work indefinitely. The neurosurgeon could not make a prediction. My personal feeling is, if the shunt does not immediately prove to fail, I think it has a pretty good chance of working out long term. That is not based on any medical facts, just my own gut feeling.

2. What happens if the V-A shunt does fail. There are two more obvious solutions for shunt placement. When I say “obvious,” I mean for a neurosurgeon. No one else has heard of them and there are a list of reasons why. The first alternate option is to drain the shunt to the gallbladder. The final option is to put the shunt in a major vein in the head. The gallbladder option may work for Agnes if needed, but it has some of the same concerns as the V-A shunt, infection risk and inability to place extra catheter. The brain vein option is not really available because as Agnes’ neurosurgeon put it, if the shunt doesn’t work in a major vein in her chest, what makes us think it will work in a major vein in her head? If those shunt options are exhausted, there is really no where else to go and we would be at the end of the line.

Her smiles are so sweet!

Her smiles are so sweet!

3. How close are we to the end of the line. As I said before, it really is dependent on the shunt. Agnes does not have any terminal condition at this point. Her respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension are being managed with significant yet not extreme measures. There is no reason to think at this point that her conditions–apart from the shunt–cannot continue to be managed. There are a few other interventions that are possibly in Agnes’ future, such as a Fundoplication (Nissen) wrap to prevent reflux and a permanent I.V. port to facilitate access for medicine and blood draws. Those options will be open for discussion once Agnes has a chance to recover from the V-A shunt surgery. In the meantime, Jeremy and I have made it clear to all the doctors that all available methods are to be used in preserving Agnes’ life. We can revisit the question later if we start to feel like things are being done to Agnes rather than for her.

The meeting was good to have, even if no new information was uncovered, just to get all the teams on the same page. And now they all know they are supposed to do anything if Agnes has a crisis. I feel good leaving things at that point for now.

For a prayer request, could you please pray that the V-A shunt works? That seems to be the cutoff between not-extreme and extreme care. Mary, Mother of God, pray for us. Saint Agnes, pray for us. Saint Maria Goretti, pray for us.

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2 responses to “Back For More

  1. JeneaSwainston says:

    Continued prayers for Agnes and you and the medical team…
    Thanks for the update!

  2. PennyClifton says:

    Thank you for the little miss smiler pictures. For a sick as she is, she is so pink and plump and sweet. I look forward to the day you can enfold her in your arms without all the equipment challenges. Holy Mother, protect Agnes and guide her surgeons.

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